Contributors sought for BBC film on pre-1967 gay life

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Mar 202016
 

Harry Pick, a BBC documentaries producer, has approached OutStories Bristol seeking gay men who have memories of gay life before 1967.

I work for the BBC in-house, and I am working on a new BBC Two film marking 50 years since the passage of the 1967 Sexual Offences Act. I thought I’d reach out to you because I believe you might be able to help put me in touch with gay men who have memories of the period before private sexual acts between gay men were legalised.

The film we want to make will use a mixture of drama and personal testimonies about gay experience pre-1967 to create a sense of the experience of trying to live as gay men in the shadow of that law and the associated social attitudes. We are particularly interested in hearing about against the odds romantic relationships and experiences with the police, the courts and the psychiatric profession and the pressures this put on individuals and those in relationships. Ultimately we also want the programme to draw to the public’s attention what life was like for gay men in this time – a story too rarely told or reflected on.

At this moment in time I’d just be very keen to speak to anyone for research purposes who can reflect on gay life before 67′ to help inform the dramatisation of the period, so we are as accurate and true to the experience of the time as possible. It’d be fantastic if you could put the word out to any of those who you have interviewed in this age bracket and see if some are willing to have a chat on the phone with me initially. No filming required!

Happy to talk further with you or anyone keen to help out.

Thank you for any help and best wishes,

Harry Pick
* BBC Documentaries, 07C BBC New Broadcasting House, Portland Place, London, W1A 1AA.

If you are interested in helping, please send a message for the attention of Andy Foyle and we’ll pass it on to Harry.

Historic England put LGBTQ heritage on the map

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Mar 202016
 

Pride of Place imageHistoric England logo

Historic England (formerly known as English Heritage) have teamed up with Leeds Beckett University and community groups nationwide to record and celebrate the places lived, loved, worked and played in by lesbian, gay, bisexual, trans and queer (LGBTQ) people over the centuries. The project, called Pride of Place, combines images, archive materials and research with the places and stories that are important to LGBTQ history.

The Pride of Place map covers the whole of England and shows hundreds of locations associated with LGBTQ people. Anyone can submit entries for the map. OutStories Bristol is contributing many locations in this region.

 

Pride of Place newsletters:

Bisi Alimi Cancellation

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Feb 162016
 

Sadly Bisi Alimi is no longer able to join us for the LGBT History Festival on Saturday. He has to go to Africa as part of his campaign work, and we have been unable to arrange his talk and flights so that he can do both. Our thanks to Bisi for trying hard to accommodate us. Hopefully we’ll be able to have him in Bristol some other time.

Of course we do have many other fine speakers available on Saturday. We hope we will still see all of you there.

History Month Preview

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Dec 042015
 

MilkFoundationWe are still firming up on a few dates and venues for next year’s National Festival of LGBT History events, but to give you a flavour of what will be happening here are some details about our headline speakers, and some of the topics being covered.

Stuart Milk is the nephew of Harvey Milk, the gay Californian politician. Stuart now heads up the Harvey Milk Foundation, and travels the world talking about LGBT rights. He’ll be spending a week in Bristol visiting local schools and universities as well as doing public events.

Lady Phyll Opoku-Gyimah is a co-founder of UK Black Pride. She was also one of the judges for this year’s Independent Rainbow List. Phyll has a long and successful career in the Civil Service and Trade Unions.

Update: Sadly Fox Fisher is no longer able to attend our event. We are actively looking for a similarly high profile trans speaker.

Other topics that will be covered by talks include:

  • Gay buildings
  • Being trans and Muslim
  • LGBT rights in the workplace
  • Radclyffe Hall
  • LGBT Radio
  • Michael Dillon
  • Mary Renault

Starting next week we’ll be introducing you to some of our other speakers.

John Addington Symonds’ 175th birthday celebrated!

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Oct 242015
 

About 25 people gathered at Clifton Hill House, Clifton, on 5th October 2015 to celebrate the legacy of one of Victorian Britain’s greatest scholar-writers, John Addington Symonds.

Born in Bristol in 1840, Symonds was the author of numerous works including The Renaissance in Italy, in seven volumes, and the first major study of ancient sexuality A Problem in Greek Ethics, published in just ten copies in 1883. These writings were a profound contribution to the early homosexual rights movement.

Clifton Hill House was Symonds’ home for many years so it was fitting that the event was held in a room that would have been very familiar to him.  The house is now a hall of residence for the University of Bristol.

Members of OutStories were the guests of Tom Richardson, Warden of Clifton Hill House, and Nicoletta Momigliano, Director of the Institute of Greece, Rome and the Classical Tradition (IGRCT) at the University. Other guests included members of the IGRCT and senior student residents of the house.

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Mapping LGBT+ Bristol has begun!

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Oct 242015
 

Work on the Mapping LGBT+ Bristol project began on 26th September with a workshop involving Josie McLellan, Nate Eisenstadt and Mike Jones (University of Bristol), Julian Warren (Bristol Record Office), Peter Insole (Bristol City Council), and members of OutStories Bristol.

Facilitated by Nate, the workshop was an opportunity for the key people to meet one another, set out the project aims and how we collaborate, clarify roles and responsibilities, and think through the process of how we collect, research and upload material to online platforms.

We are now developing teams of people to work together on the various aspects of the project: oral history, research, data collation and management, publicity, etc.

Come and join us! Everyone welcome.

Photo of workshop participants

Rear, L-R: Julian Warren, Andy Hole, Peter Insole, Charlie Beaton, Anthea Makepeace, Nate Eisenstadt.
Front, L-R: Robert Howes, Mark Small, Andrew Foyle, Chris Leigh, Mike Jones, Josie McLellan.

 

University of Bristol   AHRC logo   BristolCityCouncil_logo   Bristol museums logo

Mapping LGBT+ Bristol is funded by the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Cheryl Morgan – Exploring Gender Fluidity through Science Fiction and Fantasy

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Jun 142015
 

Exploring Gender Fluidity through Science Fiction and Fantasy - opening slide

In March Hugo Award winning author and OutStories Bristol co-chair Cheryl Morgan gave a Flagship guest lecture at Liverpool University on how Transgendered identities have been represented and evolved within science fiction writing and comics. See it on this video.

 

Cheryl herself is an active Trans writer, blogger, editor and publisher.   http://www.cheryl-morgan.com

The event was sponsored by the Liverpool University Special Archive and Collection (University Library) and the Science Fiction Foundation.

Exploring Gender Fluidity through Science Fiction and Fantasy is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 Unported License. Copy and paste this code to embed this video in another web page:

<div id=”body_frameplayer”><iframe width=”480″ height=”270″ src=”https://stream.liv.ac.uk/s/b5rdardc” scrolling=”no” frameborder=”0″ style=”max-width: 100%;” id=”object”></iframe></div>

Bristol to host a national LGBT history festival in February 2016

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Jun 132015
 

Bristol has been chosen as one of six UK cities to host a National Festival of LGBT History in February 2016. The festival will present a series of talks at Bristol’s M Shed museum, films and theatre performances.

It aims to promote research into past attitudes towards sex and gender diversity, provide a showcase for local research into LGBT history, and acknowledge the rich diversity of our community.

The festival is co-ordinated by Schools OUT as part of LGBT History Month. Events will occur over the four weekends of February 2016 in six cities – Bristol, Shrewsbury, London, Manchester, York and Tyne & Wear. Bristol events will be held on the weekend of 19th and 20th February and are being organised by OutStories.  Click here to see some of the planned events.

The festival follows on from the success of the first held in Manchester in February 2015. Speakers then included Stuart Milk, LGBT activist and nephew of assassinated pioneer Harvey Milk, veteran campaigner Peter Tatchell, and History Professor Charles Upchurch who flew in from Florida especially for the event.  The highlight of the weekend was a three-part immersive theatre production A Very Victorian Scandal which dramatised the events of Britain’s own ‘Stonewall’ event which happened in Hulme in 1880.

This 16-minute LGBTv programme gives a flavour of the event.

 

 

What they said about the First National History Festival:

“It Linda Bellos imageis wonderful and important that our real history as individuals and organisations is captured by us rather than others.”
Linda Bellos

.

PeterTatchell_image“The LGBT History Festival is a fascinating, inspiring, uplifting event that reveals and celebrates the often hidden histories of the LGBT communities.”
Peter Tatchell

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LGBT History Festival: www.twitter.com/lgbthistoryfest  #LGBTHistoryFestival
LGBT History Month:  www.twitter.com/LGBTHM    #LGBTHM16
Event calendar: www.lgbthistorymonth.org.uk/event-calendar/

LGBTHistoryMonth2016_logo-final_PNG

NationalFestivalOfLGBTHistory_banner

OutStories is opening a new chapter

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Jan 252015
 

8380389-old-book-with-copy-space-and-inkstand-isolated-on-whiteOutStories Bristol is developing a major new collaborative project with the Know Your Bristol project at the University of Bristol and Know Your Place, a website run by Bristol City Council. We are calling this project Mapping LGBT+ Bristol and it will create a permanent digital archive of the LGBT history of the Bristol area.

The project is being funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council, a government-sponsored body that finances research and post-graduate projects. It will:

  • Know your place imageSupport OutStories volunteers in researching and mapping the LGBT history of Bristol and surrounds.
  • Add a dedicated LGBT history ‘layer’ to Bristol City Council’s digital mapping website Know Your Place. Know Your Place provides a series of map bases from 1750 to the present to which community information is attached.
  • Create a new user-friendly interface embedded in OutStories’ own website that will directly access the LGBT layer on Know Your Place and facilitate crowd-sourced contributions.
  • Create a custom-made mobile app for smart phones and tablet PCs that will interface with the LGBT layer on Know Your Place. This will feature walking tours, push notifications and connections to social media.
  • Produce a series of ‘story-maps’ – geo-coded digital stories – on different facets of LGBT history.
  • Collaborate with Bristol’s LGBT youth group Freedom Youth in producing curriculum materials to be used in Bristol schools to combat the stigmatization of gender diversity and homosexuality.
  • Add new material to the LGBT archives at the Bristol Record Office and other museums and archives.
Radnor Hotel, St Nicholas Street, Bristol

Copyright: Anna Henderson.

Mapping LGBT+ Bristol will be a series of explorations of LGBT lives, both historic and present. The project will draw teams of people together to research and record histories of the diverse individuals and communities that make up Bristol’s LGBT life.

Pride Bristol 2011 - main stagePlaces of significance may range from common places where people meet (now or in the past), the shifting map of the LGBT scene, sites of memory or life events significant to one individual or small groups, places of religious toleration, dissent and diversity, and sites relevant to public, political and civic oppression and acceptance.

The project formally commences in October and will last for one year.

.

Everyone is welcome to get involved. We seek people to do research, conduct oral history interviews, produce video/audio, and create digital material for uploading to Know Your Place and our own website. Get in touch via our contact form.

 University of Bristol     AHRC logo      BristolCityCouncil_logo     Bristol museums logo

Mapping LGBT+ Bristol is funded by the Arts & Humanities Research Council

Bristol Post front page shortlisted for award

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Dec 202014
 

Bristol Post 31/3/2014

This front page picture on the Bristol Post caused quite a stir – and not all of the comments were positive! It has now been shortlisted for a national award for ‘front page of the year’.

It shows Bristol couple Mike McBeth and Matthew Symonds on their wedding on 29 March, the first day that same-sex marriage was allowed in England and Wales.

It would be nice to see a positive LGBT headline getting recognised – click here to vote.

 

Bristol raises trans flag

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Nov 232014
 
TransFlag_raising2

Lord Mayor of Bristol, the Rt. Hon. Councillor Alastair Watson, raises the transgender flag in front of City Hall

November 20th  was Transgender Day of Remembrance and,  for the first time ever, Bristol City Council held a public event aimed specifically at trans people. At 2pm the Lord Mayor, the Rt. Hon. Councillor Alastair Watson, raised the transgender flag in front of City Hall. A number of other City Councillors were in attendance.

Transgender Day of Remembrance is an international event held in memory of the hundreds of people killed every year simply because they were deemed to have transgressed social gender norms. In the last year alone, 226 victims from 28 different countries are remembered.  There have been a total of 1,612 reported killings of transgender people in 62 countries worldwide since January2008. Transgender murders often involve extreme violence and torture.  Several of the victims were teenagers and the youngest was just eight- years-old.  The vast majority of the victims identified as female.

Bristol City Council equalities officer Simon Nelson, Lady Mayoress of Bristol Sarah Watson, Lord Mayor of Bristol Councillor Alastair Watson, Martin Spellacey and Amy Mosley of Bristol City Council Rainbow Group, Bristol City Council employee Jessica Davidson and Cheryl Morgan of TransBristol”. Photo: Amy Jones.

Although there was only one known British victim this year, life for transgender people in the UK is by no means easy.  Negative portrayals in the media, discrimination and difficulty accessing health care are all major issues. According to the Trans Mental Health and Emotional Wellbeing Study 2012, 48% of British transgender people had attempted suicide at some time during their lives.

Councillor Watson said: “By raising the transgender flag over City Hall on this important day, Bristol is sending a clear signal to the many trans people who live and work in the city that they are valued members of the community, with as much right to life, health and happiness as any other citizen.”

Martin Spellacey of Bristol City Council Rainbow Group – which organised the event together with Bristol LGBT Forum – said: “While Bristol has recently been voted the best city to live in Britain, this is unfortunately not the case for many transgender people, many of whom face discrimination on a daily basis.”

TransFlag_raising3

Listen here to a conversation on Ujima Radio between TransBristol’s Cheryl Morgan and Simon Nelson, the Equality Officer of Bristol City Council. They discuss the Trans Day of Remembrance and how the City Council can do more for its trans citizens (starts 36 minutes into the programme).

John Addington Symonds’ 174th birthday celebrated!

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Oct 142014
 
Birthday cake

Happy 174th birthday. John!

About 40 people gathered at Goldney Hall, Clifton, on 5 October to celebrate the legacy of one of Victorian Britain’s greatest scholar-writers, John Addington Symonds.

Born in Bristol in 1840, Symonds was the author of numerous works including The Renaissance in Italy, in seven volumes, and the first major study of ancient sexuality A Problem in Greek Ethics, published in just ten copies in 1883.

The event was co-sponsored by the Institute of Greece, Rome and the Classical Tradition (IGRCT) at the University of Bristol and OutStories Bristol. In his introduction the IGRCT’s director, Professor Shane Butler, said that the institute promotes research into all aspects of Greco-Roman culture from antiquity to the present day in the belief that classical culture remains a vital influence in the modern world.

Shane described the significance of Symonds to academic study and to Bristol, and finished with a quote from Memoirs in which Symonds spoke of his first love as a youth, Willie Dyer, a chorister at Bristol Cathedral “I could not marry him; modern society provided no bond of comradeship whereby we might have been united. So my first love flowed to waste.”  How happy Symonds would be today to see gay marriage become a reality in Britain.

For OutStories, Andy Foyle said that while Symonds achievements as a writer, poet, critic and art historian were well acknowledged, his contribution to the early homosexual rights movement was largely ignored. It is OutStories’ aim to spread awareness and ensure that his significance is recognised.

The occasion was also the first public demonstration of a new map-based website Symonds in Bristol created by OutStories member Gemma.

After addresses, Shane cut a celebratory birthday cake. Louise Hopkins of University Heritage Volunteering led some of the guests across the road for a tour of the gardens of Clifton Hill House, Symonds’ home for many years, and described plans to restore the gardens and incorporate many elements of their original layout.

 

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Photos: Leonardo Proietti and Chris Leigh

BLAGS grant gifts portraits to M Shed

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Oct 132014
 

When Bristol Lesbian and Gay Switchboard (BLAGS) stopped taking calls earlier this year, they were left with a dilemma: what to do with the money they had accrued over the years? £1,000 was donated to the London Lesbian and Gay Switchboard who now answer calls to the Bristol helpline. The remaining £2,000 was placed in a Community Fund and BLAGS invited bids from local LGBT community groups.

We are delighted to announce that BLAGS have granted a £600 award for OutStories Bristol’s proposal to buy three portraits from Bath artist Malcolm Ashman for donation to Bristol’s M Shed museum.

Daryn Carter, Peggy Hancock and Dale Wakefield.  Portraits by Malcolm Ashman.

Portraits by Malcolm Ashman. Photo: copyright Matthew Seow www.facebook.com/matthewseow,

The pencil portraits were drawn by Malcolm for the Revealing Stories exhibition at M Shed in February/March 2013 and portray three people significant to Bristol’s LGBT history:

  • Daryn Carter who worked for Pride’s revival in 2010 and is now Director of Bristol Pride;
  • Peggy Hancock was barmaid at the Radnor Hotel, Bristol, from 1955 and a friend to many LGBT people at a time when most were not;
  • Dale Wakefield who was co-founder of Bristol Gay Switchboard in 1975.

The portraits are to be donated to M Shed and will become part of the permanent history of the city of Bristol.

Many thanks to BLAGS for generously giving the money for their purchase. It is particularly appropriate that one portrays Dale;  for its first three years the helpline operated from a bedroom in her home in Hill Street, Totterdown, using her private phone line.

Thanks also to the artist, Malcolm Ashman, who agreed to sell the portraits at well below their market value.

Honouring Bayard Rustin

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Oct 072014
 
Bayard Rustin

Bayard Rustin in 1963
(photo: Wiki/Commons)

October is Black History Month and we are featuring Bayard Rustin (1912 – 1987), a USA leader in social movements for civil rights, socialism, non-violence and gay rights.

Bayard Rustin was a gay man who had been arrested for a homosexual act in 1953. Rustin’s sexuality, or at least his embarrassingly public criminal charge, was criticized by some fellow pacifists and civil-rights leaders. From the 1950s through to the 1970s he was attacked as a “pervert” or “immoral influence” by political opponents from segregationists to Black power militants. In addition, his pre-1941 Communist Party affiliation when he was a young man was controversial.

To avoid such attacks, Rustin served only rarely as a public spokesperson; nevertheless he was an influential adviser to Martin Luther King Jr and a key strategist behind the 1963 civil rights march on Washington. 

In the 1970s he became a public advocate on behalf of gay and lesbian causes.

On 20 November 2013 President Barack Obama posthumously awarded Rustin the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the USA’s highest civilian honour.

Click here for the full article.

With thanks to www.blackhistorymonth.org.uk

 

The International Business Times also has a feature on Rustin.

Fancy a bit of gardening?

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Aug 212014
 
Clifton Hill House

Clifton Hill House

In the 1880s and 1890s writer and art historian John Addington Symonds wrote ground-breaking books in which he argued for a rational approach to homosexuality and for law reforms. For many years Symonds lived in Clifton Hill House in Clifton, now owned by the University of Bristol.

University Heritage Volunteering are seeking volunteers to help restore the historic gardens much beloved by Symonds to their former glory. The digging might find “busts of those unlovely emperors and philosophers” that Symonds brought back from Greece and are known to have been buried in the garden by his descendents when they left the house.

If you are interested in finding out more, contact Louise.Hopkins@bristol.ac.uk.

LGBTQ history in Gloucestershire online exhibition

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Apr 222014
 

Between September 2013 and March 2014 Gloucestershire Archives ran a LGBTQ history project to explore the previously hidden histories of LGBTQ residents in Gloucestershire and South Gloucestershire.

From the "Founders' and benefectors' book" of Tewkesbury Abbey, Bodleian Library (Oxford), via WikiCommons

Hugh_le_despenser

The results have been published as an online LGBTQ history exhibition and include:

  • Pubs in Cheltenham and gay discos at the Racecourse.
  • Hugh Despenser the Younger, a ‘favourite’ of King Edward II,  buried in Tewkesbury Abbey.
  • A 1716 charge of sodomy against a Cotswold tenant and a visiting farm labourer.
  • Suffragette Mary Blathwayt whose diaries can be interpreted to refer to lesbian relationships.
  • Music producer and ‘Telstar’ songwriter Joe Meek born in the Forest of Dean.

The exhibition is presented by geographical district – just click on the map to learn it’s history.

Joe Meek, music producer

Photo by Robert Thursfield, via WikiCommons

 

Gloucestershire Archives logo

Marriage (Same-Sex Couples) Act: 30 March 2014

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Mar 312014
 

 On 30 March 2014, the Marriage (Same-Sex Couples) Act allowed same-sex couples to marry for the first  time. The historic change was celebrated by several couples in Bristol and received news coverage.

Here’s a round-up of the stories in the press:

If we missed coverage elsewhere, please add a link to the comments.

Did you get married on 30 March in Bristol or attend one of the weddings that day? Tell us your story.

A successful LGBT History Month 2014

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Mar 142014
 

We had a shaky start to history month: winds and weather (and – if UKIP is to be believed – gay marriage and the gods) conspired against the first OutStories talk of 2014, which should have been Polari Mission. On 8 February, Jez Dolan’s journey from Manchester was thwarted by a landslide and a broken-down freight train on his journey to Bristol, and had to turn around and head home. We’re currently working on rescheduling his whirlwind tour of the secret language of gay men – it will probably be in May so watch this space.

Behind the Green Door…

Our inaugural event was therefore Jill Gardiner, on 15 February, who gave an overview of the Gateways club in Chelsea, and the important place it occupies in UK lesbian history. Jill took us back to the club’s origins as a basement haunt for bohemians (where customers included Dylan Thomas and Augustus John), onto its transfer to the hands of Ted Warr (who won it in a bet) and its heyday under the glorious reign of Ted’s wife Gina and Smithy, climaxing with the club’s starring role in the Killing of Sister George. Jill gave a sharp and funny overview of the development of lesbian identity through the club’s history, and brought the story alive with the views of club regulars, such as Big Lesley. Jill has written a brilliant book about the Gateways.

Jill Gardiner  bringss the Gateways club to life at M-Shed

Jill Gardiner brings the Gateways club to life at M-Shed

The following weekend, Andrew Foyle took over 20 walkers on his ever-popular Mystery History of central Bristol on 22 February, telling the stories of LGBT people in the city from multiple perspectives and sources: from crime records to oral history. Walkers learned about suffragettes concealed in organs, the Tea Set at the Radnor pub and Bristol’s pioneering place in trans surgery.

On Sunday 23 February, Cheryl Morgan flipped open the comic books in To The Bat Bed, Robin! Her illustrated talk looked at the exceedingly camp early years of US comic books, charting their history and the sometimes shocking – though sadly not surprising – homophobia. Cheryl explored how trans characters are portrayed with varying degrees of success and brought us bang up to date  with the gay superheroes of Martin Eden’s Spandex comic.

The final event – and farewell party – for LGBT History Month was What’s the Time, Mr Wolfenden? We aimed for the feel of a pre-decriminalisation gay bar of the 1960s.  Helping create the mood were DJs Tamsin and Ruth, better known as Unskinny Bop, who played a strictly 60s playlist. Everyone dressed in 60s threads, everyone danced and the Showgirl Academy did some brilliant go-go routines. We were also given some wonderful prizes by Diva Magazine and Gay Times and as a result raised over £200 for future OutStories events.

 

OutStories Bristol – the next chapter

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Nov 262013
 

8380389-old-book-with-copy-space-and-inkstand-isolated-on-whiteThe success of the Revealing Stories project resulted in encouragement from the Heritage Lottery Fund to bid for further funding for a new long-term project. We propose to create a project about place.

Place will be a series of explorations of LGBT lives, both historic and present. The project will seek to draw teams of people together to research and record histories of the diverse individuals and communities that make up Bristol’s LGBT life.

Radnor Hote, St Nicholas Street, Bristol

Radnor Hotel
Copyright: Anna Henderson

Places of significance may range from common places where people meet (now or in the past), the shifting map of the LGBT scene, sites of memory or life events significant to one individual or small groups, places of religious toleration, dissent and diversity, and sites relevant to public, political and civic oppression and acceptance.

The internet offers the most flexible and powerful way for us to deliver a new project. We envisage an interactive map-based system from which multi-media information would be accessible – including images, film, photographs and artworks inspired by place, sound clips from oral history recordings, music, text and digitised extracts from local press or publications.

The Bristol Archives website Know Your Place is well-established and provides a series of map bases from 1750 to the present to which community information is attached. We are already discussing with Bristol City Council how we can use Know Your Place as a platform on which to build our ‘layer’ of LGBT history data. This approach would extend our partnership with Bristol Museums Service and the Bristol Record Office. We will also aim to include links with educational/schools groups which was a notable success for Revealing Stories.

Everyone is welcome to get involved. We seek people to do research, conduct oral history interviews, produce video/audio, create artwork and construct the website. Get in touch via our contact form.

Bristol map 1949Bristol map 2013

UjimaRadio podcast on transphobia

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Nov 202013
 

Bristol’s Ujima Radio has put out an informative and inspiring interview with OutStories’ co-chair Cheryl Morgan on transphobia. Coinciding with this year’s Trans Day of Remembrance on 20 November, the interview quietly and calmly elucidates the discrimination and, sometimes, horrendous violence directed at trans people throughout the world.

Click on this link to listen to the programme: podcast of UjimaRadio Women’s Outlook Wednesday 20 November 2013.

Trans Day of Remembrance logo